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Category Archives: eLearning

VR Simulation at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

Johns Hopkins Student Nurse
Johns Hopkins Student Nurse
Johns Hopkins Student Nurse

“It’s amazing. You feel like you’re in a whole other world!”

Melissa Boggan, Nursing Student


Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Nursing is one of the world’s leading nursing programs, driving advancements in education, research, and practice.

As their simulation program expanded, the team at JHU were looking to scale delivery of simulation quickly, using the leading technology and software available. They therefore implemented Oxford Medical Simulation (OMS) Virtual Reality scenarios in pre-licensure and advanced practice programs across the nursing school.

The newly implemented VR program is part of their integrated simulation training program, including manikins and live actors, and complements clinical visits with hospital patients.

JHU’s Virtual Reality lab provides fully immersive virtual placements for multiple nursing programs, including the newly launched DNP Nurse Anesthesia and DNP Pediatric Dual Primary/Acute Care Nurse Practitioner programs. The program’s implementation in 2020 helped JHU maintain training momentum during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We rolled out the [OMS] virtual simulation platform over the summer, during COVID, and were able to train about 400 students in a short time frame,” says Kristen Brown, advanced practice simulation coordinator at the School of Nursing.

Johns Hopkins Simulation VR team

VR simulation, a growing movement in nurse training before the pandemic, took on new meaning when restrictions impacted learning. VR simulation made socially distanced simulation possible. The spread of coronavirus “put steam behind moving the project forward,” says Nancy Sullivan, clinical simulation director at the school. 

Implementating VR in Practice

“Since March and the beginning of restrictions for in-person clinical experiences, traditional clinical and simulation for MSN (Entry Into Nursing) students were conducted virtually to enhance and sometimes replace clinical hours. Virtual or remote simulation also replaced non-direct clinical hours for advanced practice DNP students.” 

Maximizing experiential learning opportunities, JHU learners begin with the scenarios on-screen. Students who score 80% and above can visit the school’s brand-new Virtual Reality Lab, where COVID-19 safety protocols enable them to use the VR headsets for a fully immersive experience.

Whether on-screen or via VR headset, each OMS scenario places the learners in a virtual setting with a nursing assistant, who helps users assess and manage their virtual patients. With adaptive conversation, dynamic physiology, and powered by artificial intelligence, OMS virtual patients enable patient avatars to alter their behavior based on the learner’s interventions. “Depending on when you do something, the physiological response of the patient changes,” Brown explains. “When I put the oxygen on, or how much oxygen I give, changes the scenario. It adjusts to the learner.”

Johns Hopkins Virtual Simulation Lab

“I first used the on-screen version last semester,” recalls Kristin White, a pre-licensure student who graduates from the Entry into Nursing Practice program in May. “It was an asthma patient. We practiced at home and had to score 80% on different tasks. Then we got to do it with the headset on campus, which was great, almost like real life.”

Another nursing student, Melissa Boggan, says, “It’s amazing. You feel like you’re in a whole other world.”

Following Virtual Reality sessions, students gather, at a safe distance, with their instructors to participate in a group debrief session. Together with their instructors, students discuss the case, review their performance, ask questions, learn as a team, and become better prepared for clinical practice. 

Students then repeat scenarios to help improve their performance and reduce the emotional stressors that can derail procedures. “And they don’t run the risk of hurting anyone,” Brown says. “They learn critical thinking skills while being exposed to high-risk situations not seen very often. It’s great preparation.”

Benefits of VR in Nursing Education

Virtual Simulation has numerous benefits for nursing students:

  • Increasing experiential learning opportunities 
  • Improving performance and reducing emotional stressors through repetition
  • Better preparing new nurses to enter the workforce
  • Ultimately protecting patients and improving patient care
Johns Hopkins Simulation Lab

VR simulation, as a tool in the sim toolbox, has extensive benefits for the nursing profession. “It has implications on enrollment and increased delivery of online programs, allowing nurses to remain in the workforce while advancing education,” Brown says. “More education rooted in experiential learning will produce a better-prepared workforce improving patient care.”

Brown and Sullivan are also researching how VR compares with other simulation methods and clinical practice. Early results are positive, with user  ratings being “very high in terms of usability and the scenario debriefing.” 

Vitally, when students compare OMS VR scenarios to traditional simulation and clinical experience, they either rated OMS “‘’similar’ or ‘higher'” illustrating the quality of the VR experience relative to traditional approaches. 

The JHU simulation team is now expanding OMS use in their virtual simulation program, continuing to provide world-leading simulation opportunities to their students. 

Read more from JHU

  1. Amidst Covid-19, Virtual Reality Makes “Social Distancing” Simulation Possible
  2. School Of Nursing Introduces A New, Cost-effective Form Of Training: Virtual Reality
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Virtual Simulation for Clinical Hours

Virtual simulation for clinical hours
Virtual simulation for clinical hours

Healthcare institutions are no strangers to disruptionOver the past 10 years, they have faced an ever-evolving landscape from introducing new technologies such as electronic medical records, insurance regulatory reforms, the birth of new competitors, and now a global pandemic. To build greater resilience, institutions must become instinctive. 

The most recent challenge facing universities and hospitals is effectively training and maintaining the next wave of healthcare providers, in the face of ever-decreasing opportunities to train students and clinicians through clinical placements. The answer just might be dynamic, high-fidelity, virtual simulation.

The question of how to supplement clinical hours with simulation has been an ongoing debate for some time. With the loss of physical simulation and clinical placements during the pandemic, educators realized simulation was no longer a “nice to have” learning modality but a “need to have” to supplement lost clinical hours and placements. 

Instead of asking if virtual simulation can make up lost clinical hours, educators are asking how virtual simulation can supplement or replace those clinical hours?

Eye examination in virtual reality
Pediatric nurse care in virtual reality

Can Virtual Simulation Replace Clinical Hours?

Can virtual simulation be used to replace clinical hours at all? According to a statement released by Dr. Cynthia Foronda, president of INACSL, and Robert Armstrong, president of SSH, the answer is Yes! Evidence supports the use of virtual simulation to replace clinical hours. 

Ultimately, it comes down to the governing board’s regulatory requirements to determine the scope of virtual replacement. Lawmakers quickly responded to COVID-19, loosening restrictions and allowing flexibility to fulfill clinical hour requirements. Already faced with shortages in medical personnel, the COVID-19 pandemic paved the way to leverage simulation resources and promote healthcare learners to practicing professionals while still providing them with the best educational experience possible. 

For institutions already using high-fidelity simulation for clinical hour replacement, the next question is, does virtual simulation count as high-fidelity simulation? According to the SSH definition, the answer is a clear Yes!

SSH defines high-fidelity simulation as:

Simulation experiences that are extremely realistic and provide a high level of interactivity and realism for the learner

In short, virtual simulation meets the definition perfectly.

Learn more about how you can replace clinical hours with virtual simulation. Join the upcoming webinar with Molly Schleicher MSN, RN, CHSE

How Much Virtual Simulation Equals Clinical Experience?

Our next question is how many clinical hours can virtual simulation replace. The increased intensity and efficiency of simulation makes it an ideal and efficient replacement for clinical time. Evidence supports using a 1:2 ratio for high-fidelity simulation to clinical hours. As we have established, virtual simulation is high-fidelity simulation, we can argue this same ratio applies. 

Depending on the virtual simulation source and how simulation is supported, learners could replace 1 to 4 hours of clinical time through a single virtual simulation scenario. Resources provided before and after, the simulation structure, and curriculum integration are all considerations to replace clinical hours with virtual simulation adequately.

Designing Virtual Simulation to Replace Clinical Hours

Design begins at the source, learning objectives. Educators must first determine what learning objectives they wish to meet and select an appropriate simulation scenario. 

Just as ‘no man is an island’, no simulation should stand alone. Following the INACSL Standards of Best Practice to support simulated patient experiences pre-briefing, orientation, learning objectives, reflection, and debriefing should be included in simulation design. These practices enhance the learning experience, increase the simulation’s value as a clinical replacement and increase the time defended for clinical experience. 

Pre-briefing

Pre-briefing a virtual simulation doesn’t look all that different from a physical simulation experience. Learners receive learning objectives, room orientation, equipment orientation, pre-simulation activities, simulation timeline, and the opportunity to ask questions in simulation pre-briefing. Virtual simulation lesson plans can incorporate traditional pre-briefing activities. Educators or former learners can also include a prerecorded shift report for learners to review before entering the virtual scenario. 

The most significant difference between a physical simulation pre-brief and virtual simulation pre-brief is the responsibility and time required to complete it falls more on the learner than the simulation faculty. Providing an expected timeline for this experience will help the learners guide and track their time as part of the simulation. 

Deliberate Practice

Deliberate practice improves critical thinking, clinical judgment, decision-making, and confidence. Virtual simulation provides learners with the opportunity to repeat scenarios as many times as they’d like. This reflective practice offers the personalized and individualized experience of running a scenario repeatedly without adding the time, space, or cost associated with running a physical simulation again and again. 

Virtual simulation is ideal for deliberative practice as the standardization is consistent, regardless of repetition. With the OMS platform, the scenario evolves based on the learner’s clinical decision-making. Individualized feedback post-scenario provides the learner with resources to enhance their experience with each repetition. When building a simulation program to replace clinical hours, consider requiring learners to complete the scenario at least twice. 

Reflection

A key component of any experiential learning activity is reflection. This can occur mid-scenario as part of a reflective pause (reflection-in-action), or post-scenario (reflection-on-action). Combined with deliberative practice, learners can immediately return to the same scenario, now with the knowledge and insight gained from the first pass through, preparing learners to reflect-in-action in the follow-up experience. 

Within the OMS platform, learners are prompted to self-reflect immediately following each scenario. They receive personalized, objective feedback based on their clinical decision-making. Finally, there is a place provided for learners to complete and document a proper self-debrief or self-reflection. While the research on self-debrief, post-virtual-simulation is ongoing, so far the news is “it works!”

Debrief

Simulation debriefing is one of the most crucial simulation-based education components and the cornerstone of the learning experience. Each simulation must have a debriefing or feedback method. It should be consistent and is an absolute necessity when using virtual simulation to replace clinical hours. 

With virtual simulation, debriefing techniques – such as PEARLS debriefing tool are built into the platform. These can support and facilitate synchronous or asynchronous debriefing. The effectiveness of the debriefing experience in physical simulation depends on the facilitator’s expertise, time, and tools. 

While debriefing immediately after the experience is ideal, it may not always be possible. The pandemic restrictions made us reconsider how we debrief virtually, at a distance, and occasionally asynchronously.

Depending on scheduling, a group debrief immediately following the simulation experience may be possible.  This could be in-person or virtually via a video conferencing platform. A chatroom-style classroom on a learning management system also allows synchronous or asynchronous group debriefing.

When unable to coordinate group debriefs, learners can complete a self-reflection and conduct a self-debrief using the feedback, guided questions, and supplemental post-simulation activities. If a later group debrief is scheduled, learners can then review and bring their input to this group discussion. 

Although there is some debate on how long debrief sessions should last, research and best practice suggest debriefing approximately twice the scenario’s length. For example, a 20-minute simulation scenario should incorporate about 40-minutes of debriefing.

Post Simulation Activities

Post-simulation activities are another opportunity to extend a learner’s experience and physical practice. 

Learners can practice documenting their virtual experience assessment. On-screen virtual simulation, in particular, lends itself to this nicely to this experience. Learners can take notes as they go and catch missed items in their subsequent runs of the scenario. Practice notes or EHR notes provide learners the opportunity to practice completing documentation. Institutions without an EHR platform can build distance-friendly solutions through Excel or Google Forms, creating a simulated EHR experience that can be tracked and reviewed by faculty.

Another post-simulation activity option is a shift-to-shift report based on the scenario. Learners can record a shift-to-shift report and post the recording to the LMS for peer review and instructor feedback. 

Additional design resources:

Book a demo and connect one-to-one with an Educational Specialist to learn more about replacing clinical hours with simulation.

Virtual Simulation Example

In an OMS Distance nursing simulation scenario participants engage with George, a 28-year-old male presenting with chills and feeling generally unwell. His medical history includes Testicular Cancer and Type 1 Diabetes. Lab results reveal low WBC and high lactic acid levels correlating with vital signs suggestive of sepsis. George needs antibiotics but has a severe penicillin allergy.

Note: This same structure can also be used for the medical scenarios or interprofessional education scenarios, depending on the implementation.

Goals:

  • Allow learners the opportunity to practice critical thinking and efficient patient care.
  • Provide a post-scenario structure that allows for self-reflection, personalized feedback, and scenario debrief.
  • Create a virtual experience that meets expectations to qualify for clinical hour replacement.

Timeline (mileage may vary per learner):

Component Details/Examples Time
Pre-briefing Present learning objectives

Provide relevant reading 

Assign tutorial scenario

20 minutes
Deliberate Practice Complete virtual simulation

Example: George, SNR101US

20 minutes
Reflection Review scenario feedback

Complete reflective practice (Reflection must be three or more sentences and shared with your clinical lead)

10 minutes
Deliberate Practice Repeat virtual simulation

Example: George, SNR101US

20 minutes
Reflection Review scenario feedback

Complete reflective practice (Compare and contrast your current attempt to your previous)

10 minutes
Debrief/

Post Simulation Activities

Group debrief

Simulation documentation

Individual debriefing worksheet

40 minutes
Total time: 2 hours

In our example, a single virtual reality simulation scenario provided 2 hours of meaningful simulated clinical experience. We are utilizing the 1:2 replacement ratio that equates to 4 hours of clinical time.

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Distance and Virtual Simulation Resources

It’s been over two months since many institutions across the world have had to cancel face-to-face education. Let’s take a minute to celebrate the immense amount of work, adaptation and change educators and students alike have had to do in order to continue delivering quality education at a distance!

One of our values here at OMS is collaboration. As we all continue to adapt to the new normal and consider the Fall semester, we’d like to partner, assist and collaborate with faculty in the process of implementing distance and virtual simulation. 

We do this in our everyday work as we chat with you about your needs and learning objectives. We’re also helping by continuing to offer our 60-day free Implementation trial to support distance learning. And we’ve now created a suite of guides, activities and templates to help you implement OMS in the distance learning classroom. 

We’ve been able to create many of these resources thanks to the quick work of the  #FOAMsim community, who have banded together to share their knowledge about the implementation of virtual simulation. Expert authors and communities of practice such as the International Nursing Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL), Simulation Canada, Margaret Verkyl, Cynthia Foronda, Jocelyn Ludlow, and more have released a wealth of information related to virtual simulation. A few of our favorites are:

INACSL Micro Webinars 

  • Evidence to Support Virtual Simulation as an Effective Pedagogy During the Pandemic: Research and Policy Implications
  • Prebriefing Guide for Online, Remote and Virtual Simulations
  • Debriefing Virtual Simulation: The Evidence and Recommendations

Simulation Canada Webinars

OMS Blog and Webinar

While we’re all for staying as up-to-date and informed as possible and reviewing primary sources of information, we also recognize that time is a precious resource, so save you time and energy we’ve watched all the webinars and read the relevant research!

With any OMS trial we therefore provide free consultation on best-practice for virtual and distance simulation implementation, blended learning tools and access to our latest evidence-based resources for faculty.

These cover topics such as:

  • Considerations for implementing distance and virtual simulation, including setting expectations, grading (or not), preparatory work, debriefs, and post-scenario activities
  • Walkthrough guides for synchronous and asynchronous distance and virtual simulation activities
  • Self-reflection activities for students
  • …with more to come!

In the meantime, in the spirit of #FOAMsim you can now download one of these resouces “OMS Distance Faculty Resource: Setting Expectations for Learners” below. We’d love to hear your feedback on it!

Download: Setting expectations for learners

For access to all the resources above, please get in contact with us. For updated information please also consider signing up for our monthly newsletter which includes up-to-date research and news from the virtual simulation community. 

Thanks for your time, onwards and upwards! 

Post by Christina Choung, RN, BScN, CHSE – Educational Specialist at Oxford Medical Simulation

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Using Distance Simulation to Supplement Clinical Hours

Clinical hours replacement with VR simulation
Nursing Virtual Simulation Oxford Medical Simulation
Nursing Virtual Simulation Oxford Medical Simulation

In these uncertain times, universities and hospitals are being forced to reconsider how to train their learners and keep students on track to graduate or promote the next wave of healthcare providers. 

For some, the question of how to supplement clinical hours with simulation has been an ongoing question or debate. Now, simulation is no longer a “nice to have” learning modality for programs but a “need to have”. Furthermore, live simulation is no longer an option for most so the question becomes, how can virtual simulation be used to supplement or replace lost clinical hours?

This is a question on so many minds at the moment and while the research and data to fully support this answer is still coming, there are several existing resources and theories around simulation-based education that can be used to help answer it. 

“Simulation is no longer a ‘nice to have’ learning modality, but a ‘need to have'”

Can I Use Virtual Simulation for Clinical Hour Replacement?

First, there is the initial question of can virtual simulation be used to replace clinical hours at all? According to a statement released by Dr. Foronda (president of INACSL) and Bob Armstrong (president of SSH) the evidence and these organizations support the use of virtual simulation to replace clinical hours. This statement outlines the problem being that students may be blocked from graduating from their programs because of clinical hour requirements.

This ultimately comes down to the state policymakers but many states in the United States have already loosened the reins on these requirements to allow for flexibility. In a time where there are already shortages in medical personnel and now a pandemic on top of that, it is critical to support the training and promotion of these health care students to practicing health care professionals (doing so in a way that still provides them the best educational experience possible). 

The next question for some whose state legislation allows high-fidelity simulation to replace clinical hours is: does virtual reality or virtual simulation count as high-fidelity simulation? The answer to that, based on the SSH definition of high-fidelity simulation is clear: Yes.

According to the SSH Dictionary,  “high-fidelity refers to simulation experiences that are extremely realistic and provide a high level of interactivity and realism for the learner” which includes virtual reality. 

“Does virtual reality or virtual simulation count as high-fidelity simulation? The answer to that, based on the SSH definition of high-fidelity simulation is clear: Yes”

Clinical hours replacement with VR simulation
Clinical hours replacement with VR simulation
COVID-19 PROGRAM COVID-19 PROGRAM DETAILS

How Much Time in Virtual Simulation Equals Clinical Experience?

Now that we’ve established virtual reality and virtual simulation is high-fidelity simulation and there is evidence to support its use in place of live clinical experiences during this pandemic, the primary question has been how many clinical hours can be replaced with virtual simulation. 

The answer to this depends on the source of virtual simulation, the resources provided before and after and the structure in which the simulations are implemented into the curriculum. The following is one example, using an OMS Distance nursing simulation scenario, in which one scenario could replace up to 4 hours of clinical. This same structure can also be used for the medical scenarios or interprofessional education scenarios depending on how they are implemented.

This example is based on using the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation Design and Debriefing to support prebriefing and debriefing activities before and after simulation. It is also using evidence from the 2019 study supporting 2:1 clinical to simulation hour ratio

The following example was created starting with the simulation itself and working out (adding pre-simulation and post-simulation activities). Again, this is based on personal experience as a simulation educator, what is known about the standards of best practice and specifically using OMS scenarios as an example. These guidelines can be used for any virtual simulation and then can translate back to live simulation or live VR simulation (headset or HMD) when learners are able to return to campus.

To allow learners the opportunity to practice critical thinking and efficient patient care, each scenario is 20 minutes in length. Although the question of how long to debrief an experience has been debated, the research and best practice that I’ve always been taught is to debrief for twice the length of the scenario.

In this case, 40 minutes which can include the provided self-reflection and personalized feedback. In this example, 1 virtual OMS simulation scenario could equate to 1 full hour of simulation or clinical experience; however, there is much more that can and should be built into this simulation experience to increase the value as well as length of time. 

How Do I Use Deliberate Practice in Virtual Simulation?

There are several simulation practices that can enhance the learning experience that can be incorporated into this timeline. First, deliberate practice which improves critical thinking, clinical judgment, decision making and confidence. An advantage of using virtual simulation, whether on screen or in a headset, is the ability to allow students to repeat scenarios as many times as they’d like (deliberate practice). This practice provides the personalized and individualized experience of running a scenario again and again without adding the time, space, or cost associated with running a live simulation again and again. In this example, it’s suggested to have the students run the scenario at least twice. 

Can I Use Reflective Pause / Reflection-in-action?

Another tool that can be helpful in simulation-based learning is the reflective pause or focus on reflection-in-action. In this example, students are encouraged to reflect-on-action by reviewing the feedback and completing their reflection after the initial scenario. However, then by having students immediately return to the same scenario, now with the knowledge and insight gained from the first passthrough, they are better prepared to reflect-in-action during their subsequent experiences. 

As previously mentioned, in this virtual reality simulation platform, students are prompted to do a self-reflection immediately after completing the scenario. Then, they are given personalized yet objective feedback based on their clinical decision making during the scenario. And finally, there is a place provided for students to then complete and document a proper self-debrief or self-reflection. In this example, students can take about 20 minutes to do this after the first session, then extend that time using additional activities and debriefing methods to 40 minutes after the second session. A full timeline breakdown is provided below. 

How Do I Debrief Virtual Simulation?

According to the INACSL Standards of Best Practice: Simulation Design – criterion 8, each simulation should have a debriefing or feedback method and it should be consistent. While the self-reflection and feedback provided with OMS is based on the PEARLS method, there are several methods that can be used to debrief a virtual simulation

In this example, at least 40 minutes should be used in the final debriefing session which gives educators time to allow students to review the objective feedback and then break into additional group debriefing. This group debriefing can be via video conferencing (ideal) or via a chatroom style classroom on a learning management system. 

Additionally, students can be asked to complete a post-simulation activity to extend their learning experience and physical practice. For example, students can practice documenting their assessment from their virtual experience. On-screen virtual simulation (compared to headset/HMD VR) lends itself to this nicely as students can take notes as they go and catch missed items in their subsequent runs of the scenario. Documentation can be done in a note fashion or by using an EHR platform. EHR’s can also be created using Excel or Google Forms. 

Another post-simulation activity option is to have students record themselves doing a shift-to-shift report based on the scenario. This report can then be posted to the LMS for peer review and feedback. 

Depending on the scheduling ease or conflicts, a group debrief immediately following the simulation experience may not be possible (although debriefing immediately after the experience is ideal). In this case, students can complete the self-reflection and conduct a self-debrief using the feedback, guided questions and supplemental post-simulation activities. If a group debrief is scheduled for a later time, students can then review and bring with them their feedback to this group discussion. 

To learn more about debriefing virtual simulations, see Simulation Canada‘s webinar “Virtual simulations: What are my debriefing options?

Should I Prebrief Virtual Simulation?

The last thing missing from this experience is prebriefing (INACSL Standard of Best Practice: Simulation Design, criterion 7) which does not have to look very different from prebriefing a live simulation experience. In live simulation, students may be provided with a room orientation, orientation to equipment, learning objectives, pre-simulation activities, a timeline, and the opportunity to ask questions. Using the LMS, students can be provided with learning objectives, pre-simulation activities or reading assignments, as well as a forum to ask questions and troubleshoot before their virtual simulation. Room and equipment orientation is then provided by OMS via videos to teach or remind students how to navigate the virtual scenarios and review the feedback. Educators or former students could also include a recorded shift report for students to review online prior to entering the OMS scenario. 

The biggest foreseen difference between a live simulation prebrief and virtual simulation prebrief is that the responsibility and time required to complete this falls on the student. In this example, prebriefing time will be considered 20 minutes. To help guide and track students time, part of the prebriefing experience should be providing the students with the expected timeline for this experience. An example of this posted to the LMS may look like this:

Today’s Simulation Experience timeline:

  1. Please complete the pre-simulation activities (20 minutes)
  2. Complete simulation scenario – George, SNR101US (20 minutes)
  3. Review feedback and complete “My reflective practice” (20 minutes) – Reflection must be 3+ sentences and shared to faculty
  4. Repeat simulation scenario – George, SNR101US (20 minutes)
  5. Review feedback, complete “My reflective practice” comparing first attempt to second attempt, complete additional post-simulation assignment (group debrief, documentation assignment, individual debrief using worksheet or tool, etc) (40 minutes)

“In this virtual simulation example, the 2 hour virtual simulation experience (based on a 20 minute scenario run twice with structured prebriefing before and debriefing after) would equal 4 hours of clinical time.”

Final Timeline Review

In review, we’ve now taken a single virtual reality simulation scenario and structured it’s execution to equate to 2 hours of simulation time. 

The final element of this “how much clinical time equals virtual simulation” debate is considering how much live simulation is considered clinical time. In this scenario, we are considering virtual simulation and live simulation time equivalent, although future research and data can hopefully help clear up whether that ratio is appropriate. 

Due to the increased intensity and efficiency of simulation, evidence supports using a 1:2 ratio for simulation to clinical time. What this means is that for every 1 hour of simulation, students are given 2 hours of clinical time. In this virtual simulation example, the 2 hour virtual simulation experience (based on a 20 minute scenario run twice with structured prebriefing before and debriefing after) would equal 4 hours of clinical time. 

This information, as well as a discussion and demonstration of the OMS Distance platform is also provided as a Webinar. To access the webinar or discuss this further with an Educational Specialist, please click below.

SEE THE WEBINAR WEBINAR

Article by Molly Schleicher RN, MSN, CHSE – Educational Specialist at Oxford Medical Simulation

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