Category Archives: Interprofessional VR simulation

OMS named as finalists at the VR Awards

OMS Interprofessional makes the finals of the 2020 VR Awards

We are honored and excited to have been nominated as a finalist for the 2020 VR Awards for OMS Interprofessional.

OMS Interprofessional is the multiplayer virtual reality platform from Oxford Medical Simulation. Designed to provide immersive training opportunities for doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals, OMS Interprofessional lets clinicians work together wherever they are in the world. 

A doctor in California can now work with a nurse in Oxford and a facilitator in Baltimore to treat virtual patients. Participants can speak to the virtual patient and each other in real time, carry out examinations, make diagnoses and provide treatments just like in real life.

They can then learn from personalized feedback and repeat as often as they need in order to provide the best care for patients in real life. Using OMS Interprofessional can optimize quality of training while freeing up time, space and money to help hospitals provide optimal patient care.

Winners will be announced in November – until then we’ve got our fingers and toes crossed! 

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What is VR simulation good for in 2020?

Reading Time: 4 – 6 minutes

 

Every year, January brings the largest event in the global simulation calendar: IMSH. This year, we were excited by the ongoing and mounting interest in virtual reality simulation and improved learner outcomes.

 

Shifting perspectives 

At IMSH this year we noticed a marked shift in the awareness and understanding of VR simulation in the wider simulation community. 

Back in 2019, people were asking, “What do you mean exactly when you say ‘VR?’”. This year we were instead asked “VR has been around for a few years… what’s it good for?” and “Is it practical enough to be used meaningfully for sim?”. 

These are excellent questions. 

Here, we look at some of the ways that VR sim can be used to; create efficiencies, optimize data and encourage flexible learning – including some of the crucial concepts to consider when looking to implement a VR platform in your simulation facility.

Doing More with Less

Physical (mannikin-based) simulation involves significant overhead costs. Research has shown that faculty/admin hours, equipment, maintenance, space, and consumables contribute to an average cost of $390 to deliver just one traditional simulation session(13).

In contrast, immersive VR is instantly scalable, allowing institutions to deliver more simulation experiences to their learners at a greatly reduced cost. Because VR simulation is repeatable and can be used without faculty supervision – meaning engaging clinical experiences can be provided using fewer valuable resources.

One recent study showed “no significant differences in quantitative measures of learning or performance” in VR vs. physical sim, but demonstrated that VR sim was more affordable(4). Institutions have capitalized on using VR to deliver sim that is 5 – 50x cheaper than physical sim.

The ultimate goal of using VR for sim is to increase access to this incredibly powerful teaching method and make simulation part of everyday life (not just when learners are in the sim center).

Consideration #1

When seeking to implement VR sim, make sure you consider whether or not you are looking for a faculty-independent platform that will free up the time needed to run simulation sessions, as not all solutions offer this.

Supporting Data-Driven Simulation

Collecting information about a learner’s performance and behavior during physical sim can be time-consuming and often requires subjective input. Using standardized simulations in immersive VR allows educators to deliver more simulation experiences whilst leveraging the data-tracking and analytic power of a technology-based system. 

This push towards data-driven learning experiences makes 2020  one of the most exciting times to be working in simulation and is empowering institutions to further the use of sim in ways previously considered impossible.

The most immediate – and important – use of this data is to support the performance improvement of learners. However, these analytics can further be used to research clinical behavior, supplement assessment techniques, and aid in recruitment processes.

Sim educators have historically struggled to show the economic impact of their efforts. Now, for the first time in history, having simple access to the type of data VR-based systems offer allows instructors to justify sim implementation to key stakeholders who are increasingly asking simulationists to “measure the effectiveness of what we do, how we do it, and why we do it.(5)

Consideration #2 

Platforms that offer standardized and peer-reviewed VR scenarios allow for detailed, personalized, and thorough analytics. Creating custom content in VR is undoubtedly appealing and may be useful in certain cases, however it removes the possibility of having rich, scalable feedback across cohorts. Implementing a broad range of standardized scenarios may provide you with the same variations as building your own, without compromising the levels of feedback you can give to learners.

Meeting Demands of Flexible Learning

Studies are increasingly finding that immersing a learner into a virtual world via a Head-Mounted-Display (HMD) has a greater impact on educational outcomes than screen-based learning(6). However, as simulation becomes a part of everyday life and distance-learning options are increasingly in favor, institutions need a way to deliver these simulations when VR hardware is not available.

Meeting the evolving educational needs of hospitals and universities means using a virtual reality platform that can support immersive VR sim in addition to an identical screen-based experience. 

Consideration #3 

As you consider approaching a hybrid VR-immersion/screen-based implementation, evaluate whether or not your learners will also need to use VR for group-based simulations, individual learning sessions, and multiplayer for interprofessional simulation experiences. 

We’re excited to see how our partners – and the wider sim community – will continue to advance the use of virtual reality in simulation in 2020. For more information about how VR simulation can work for you, contact us here.

References

  1. McIntosh (2006). Simulation: What does it really cost? https://journals.lww.com/simulationinhealthcare/Fulltext/2006/00120/Simulation__What_does_it_really_cost_.41.aspx
  2. Iglesias-Vázquez (2007). Cost-efficiency assessment of Advanced Life Support (ALS) courses based on the comparison of advanced simulators with conventional manikins. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2174929/
  3. Pottle (2019). Virtual Reality Medical Simulation: Economic Evaluation and Return on Investment. Available on request.
  4. Haerling (2018). Cost-Utility Analysis of Virtual and Mannequin-Based Simulation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29373382
  5. Waxman (2019). SSH March Presidential Message. https://www.ssih.org/About-SSH/News/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/2153/March-Presidential-Message
  6. Krokos, Plaisant, and Varshney (2019). Virtual memory palaces: immersion aids recall. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10055-018-0346-3

Contact us for further information on anything discussed in this blog.

Video: OMS Interprofessional at IMSH 2020

IMSH 2020 VR - OMS

Dr. Jack Pottle outlines OMS Interprofessional during the IMSH 2020 conference

Interprofessional Education (IPE) in VR

Dr. Jack Pottle, Chief Medical Officer of Oxford Medical Simulation, speaks with the team at HealthySimulation about the OMS VR simulation system.

“OMS is taking the traditional way we do simulation and scaling it – saving time, saving space and saving money” 

Designed for medical and nursing professionals of all levels, Dr Pottle outlines the development of OMS Interprofessional – the IPE mode that allows clinicians to treat virtual patients together wherever they are in the world.

OMS is helping healthcare system expand and optimize their simulation delivery to improve patient care…

“Allowing hospitals, hospital systems and simulation centers deliver training that is objective, standardized and of seriously high quality. It feels real; it improves performance”

Learn more about the OMS platform here, or discover more about interprofessional simulation below.

See more of OMS Interprofessional

Introducing OMS Interprofessional

Oxford Medical Simulation is excited to announce the launch of multiplayer virtual reality training with OMS Interprofessional

 

OMS Interprofessional is the multiplayer VR simulation platform from Oxford Medical Simulation (OMS). OMS Interprofessional allows multiple learners to be in the same virtual reality scenario at one time, whether they are in the same room or different countries. Learners can collaborate, discuss and make decisions as a team, just like in real life, to improve patient care

Driven by our mission to provide healthcare professionals with quality, effective clinical training at scale our multiplayer scenarios are fully immersive and interactive. Learners across disciplines can now practice managing patients as a team in real life clinical environments without risking patient safety. This regular, flexible training builds teamwork, confidence, competence and optimises transfer of learning to practice. 

How does it work? 

Using VR headsets, learners are immersed in clinical environments with dynamic, engaging patients in true-to-life clinical scenarios where they can assess and treat patients in collaboration with their colleagues. Learners can see multiple patients, interviewing,  examining, investigating, engaging with their interdisciplinary team to treat their patient – who responds as in real life. 

The focus in OMS Interprofessional is on teamwork, communication, critical thinking and clinical reasoning – allowing clinicians to apply their knowledge and learn together. After each scenario learners enter a group debriefing environment, allowing them to analyse performance as a team, discussing the case and focusing on human factors just like in traditional simulation. 

Team performance analytics are also available to learners and faculty to facilitate debriefing, progress tracking and needs identification. Learners can enter the multiplayer environment with faculty or as independent teams allowing for flexible and adaptive use cases. 

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What are the benefits? 

There are multiple benefits to integrating OMS Interprofessional into healthcare training curricula. The immersive team-based scenarios allow interdisciplinary teams to work together repeatedly at any time to refine teamwork and communication skills. This flexible system lets organizations deliver simulation efficiently and effectively to improve patient care.

The portable, stand-alone OMS system is simple set-up, while intuitive, faculty-free use allows organizations to scale simulation delivery and integrate simulation into everyday practice.Moreover, multiplayer VR simulation allows learners to be trained at distance, entering scenarios from anywhere in the world regardless of their proximity to faculty and physical training locations. Faculty can be based in New York and train learners in Nairobi!

Every scenario accurately mirrors real-life,  with peer-reviewed presentations, adaptive conversation, pharmaceutical modelling and dynamic physiology to ensure clinical realism. This provides consistently quality, standardized simulation on demand. The OMS system then provides immediate, intelligent, team-based feedback on technical and non-technical skills, consolidating knowledge and facilitating debrief. Detailed metrics and analytics dashboards allow organizations to objectively measure performance and track improvements over time, whilst customizable feedback and blended learning allow seamlessly integration with curriculum requirements and protocols.